How to hand pollinate an orchid

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You want to look for the pollen head under the top flower.

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Then, pop off the cap of the pollen head.

 

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You will find the golden yellow pollen under the cap, it is usually sticky.

 

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Next, look under where the cap was for an indent.

 

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This is where you place the pollen.

 

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Now the orchid has been hand pollinated!

Here is what is blooming this week!

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x Brassolaeliocattleya Fort Watson “Mendenhall”

 

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x Brassolaeliocattleya Majestic Light “Hidden Treasure”

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Psychopsis sp.

 

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Ryncholaeliocattleya Blumen Insel “Jack Queen Aoki”

 

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Laelia purpurata var. nubra sanguinea x Laelia purpurata-stinata “Estrella”

 

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Laeliocattleya Tropical Pointer “Cheetah”

 

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x Potinara Sweet Norma “Paradise”

 

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Dendrobium Burana Sunshine g. “Blue”

 

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x Laeliocattleya Wolterae

 

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Dendrobium Woon Leng

 

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x Brassolaeliocattleya Mem Vida Lee “Limelight”

 

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x Brassolaeliocattleya Waianea Leopard “Ching Hua”

 

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Brassocattleya Hawaiian Leopard “Mei Ling”

 

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Oncidium sp.

 

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Epidendrum Beppy Gouda

 

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x Burrageara Pacific Command

 

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Sunken Gardens – St. Pete, Florida

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Laughing Kookaburras

 

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Amazon parrots

 

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giant live oak

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Macaws

 

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so many angel trumpet trees

 

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orchid house 

 

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Livistona chinensis – Chinese Fan Palm

 

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rainbow eucalyptus

 

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Tibouchina urvilleana – Princess Flower

 

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conservation/education teams up with horticulture!

 

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giant bird of paradise

 

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shrimp plant

 

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17 year old umbrella cockatoo

 

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These pictures start our visit at Craig Hugel’s wildflower garden & nursery

 

 

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this is an idea for a marsh plant in your front yard garden

 

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scrub landscaping

 

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wildflower garden – keep bunnies out!

 

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Craig Hugel’s native orchid collection

 

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Key Largo plant specimen collecting

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This trip took place in Key Largo, Florida – the first key. We went to the Nike Missile Base (when the US had missiles pointed at Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis.) Less than twenty people have a permit to walk the land of this preservation ground. As you can see in the pictures, this sacred piece of earth is littered with garbage, glass, plastics, and just about anything else you can think of. Although it makes sense that with the many hurricanes destroying parts of the tropics that trash would spread through the ocean, seeing it in person and understanding that miles after miles after ground that a handful of humans walk on cannot even barely be walked on. To think about how nature survives is startling because I saw plants being covered and crabs unable to walk across all of the garbage. Think before you throw your trash anywhere but a garbage or recycling can! We are losing some of the most beautiful places on this earth – land and sea.

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this is where the coral reef used to be

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mangrove burm

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decayed tree

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mangrove surviving in the litter

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pressing the plant specimens

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coral reef remnants

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view of the crocodile bay

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a palm seed struggling to survive among all of the trash

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Ethan, our wildlife intern, holding a crabImage,

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Everglades – tropical botany

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mineral deposit sink holes

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Orchid: Encyclia tampensis native in trees

 

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fully submerged plants

 

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turtle!

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alligator basking

 

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wild tillandsia

 

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more encyclia tampensis

 

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strangler fig

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gumbo limbo trail

 

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animal topiary in Miami

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mosaic of the everglades

Montgomery Botanic Center – Miami, FL

This is the world's only epiphytic-growing cycad known as Zamia pseudoparasitica. This plant originated in Panama. It now grows in Montgomery's new shade house.

This is the world’s only epiphytic-growing cycad known as Zamia pseudoparasitica. This plant originated in Panama. It now grows in Montgomery’s new shade house.

 

Syagru s cearensis from S. America

Syagru s cearensis from S. America

 

Synsepalum msolo - this tree is rarely seen outside of Africa.

Synsepalum msolo – this tree is rarely seen outside of Africa.

 

Sabal mauritiiformis

Sabal mauritiiformis

“Montgomery Botanical Center is the living legacy of Robert and Nell Montgomery, widely known as the founders of Fairchild Tropical Garden (now Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden). Housed on their 120-acre Coral Gables estate, it included the largest and finest private collections of palms and cycads in the world. As a living tribute to her late husband, in 1959 Nell created The Montgomery Foundation, Inc.—later renamed the Montgomery Botanical Center (MBC)—as an independent, nonprofit institution devoted to advancing the science of tropical botany.

Our Mission

The mission of MBC is to advance science, education, conservation, and horticultural knowledge of tropical plants, emphasizing palms and cycads, and to exemplify excellent botanical garden design. Through this mission, MBC endeavors to make the Montgomery name known and respected throughout the world in the field of plant science.

MBC carries out its mission by collecting seeds from wild populations of palms and cycads from around the world. MBC then germinates these seeds in its nursery and grows the resulting plants in population-based, documented, scientific collections in its extensive garden pursuant to excellent botanical garden design. MBC fosters and participates in scientific research by collecting and maintaining scientific data on its collections, making its collections and scientific data available to scientists for research purposes, and disseminating this research and data through scientific and popular publications. MBC cooperates with many botanical institutions and countries around the world by making its plant collections, knowledge, and expertise available to their scientists, educators, and students. MBC staff also explain the mission and operations to the general public through workshops, lectures, publications, and tours of the plant collections.

MBC’s well-documented, wild-collected, population-based, tropical plant collections are extraordinary in their scientific, educational, and conservation value—and the botanical garden that contains those collections is extraordinary in its design and beauty.

Our Planting Policy

MBC’s plant collections must comply with the following four core principles:

  1. Plants must have scientific, conservation, and/or educational value;

  2. Have a reasonable chance of growing on the property;

  3. Be maintained following exemplary horticultural practices; and

  4. Be incorporated into the collection in an aesthetically pleasing landscape design.”

I was given a tour of MBC by Dr. Chad Husby, Collections Manager and Botanist with a large interest in tropical conifers.

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beautiful Ficus on the grounds

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This is the seed of the “Double Coconut.” It is the largest seed in the world! It is the Ludocea plant, which takes 8 years to germinate – hypo geo germination. Montgomery has two of these seeds planted currently.

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Just some pictures from around the gardens, including the many peacocks who call Montgomery their home – even some babies running around!

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red-toned Gumbo Limbo trees

This is the Nypa fruticans "the mangrove palm" collected from Malaysia in 1982 that now lives in Montgomery's Nypa Lake.

This is the Nypa fruticans “the mangrove palm” collected from Malaysia in 1982 that now lives in Montgomery’s Nypa Lake. This is the saltwater palm. It has a carpel like a leaf and has a fossil record which makes it one of the most primitive plants.

Today in Fort Myers

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Double crested cormorant bird

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This dog gets around in style!

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Smokey & I having adventures around Gulf Harbor

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Smoke dog at the beach!

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sweet King Tut

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napping under the sea grapes

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On our way to the beach!

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the in-laws/neighbors — Smokey’s girlfriend, Lilly.

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Gulf Harbor yacht club

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My happy dog loves living by the ocean!

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giant wild iguana in my backyard

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gopher turtle!